Tech

Command & Conquer Remastered in the test: Welcome to 2020, Commander

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How did we miss it: “Under construction, unity ready, insufficient funding.” After 25 years, EA and the Petroglyph Games studio founded by former Westwood employees are bringing back the real-time strategy classic Command & Conquer and its offshoot Command & Conquer: Red Alert. In the Remastered Edition, the already dusty game is given a general overhaul. Not only do we get to see it in 16: 9 format resolutions for the first time, the low-resolution cutscenes were digitally pretted up with real people.

Petroglyph does what Blizzard did with Warcraft 3 Reforged and brings a really playable remake that neither crashes nor falsifies the charm of the original – a real surprise for fans of the Command & Conquer series.

Long-established serial fans will already know the scenario: In C&C, the troops of the Global Defensive Initiative fight against the henchmen of the Brotherhood of Nod, led by the charismatic bald man Kane. With the help of Tiberium, we build our armies out of vehicles, planes and cyborgs and stomp through the enemy base with a grin. Red alert level is almost identical, replacing the parties with more realistic Allies and Cold War Soviets and allowing both alliances to compete against each other. Instead of Tiberium, there is ore that is identical in terms of game technology and the variety of units is somewhat larger.

Cutscenes have been revised. (Picture:

From today’s perspective, however, the two archetypes have some weaknesses: who still commands his troops through the terrain with left clicks? Who voluntarily foregoes training lines and clicks on each unit individually? This is where the Remastered Edition comes in and offers an alternative control scheme, which is fittingly referred to as a modern style. Not only can we right-click on our units, we can also permanently display their life bars.

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What gaming professionals or those who want to become should be happy: Actions can be assigned to any shortcut keys. This enables us to build buildings, units and vehicles much faster. If you like e-sports classics like Starcraft 2, you should also be pleased with various camera hotkeys with which we can switch from one side of the battlefield to another without having to move the mouse a lot.

Come on Blechbubi, dance!

For the Remastered Edition, the development team sat down and re-mixed known music and sounds from the two C&C parts in better audio quality. Rocket launchers sound fuller, fighter planes roar gaudier and tank cannons clatter with a rich bass. The voices of the units, on the other hand, were retained, which takes us straight back to the past when we heard Tanja’s saying “Come on Blechbubi, dance!” heard over and over again.

But it creates funny moments in other places – because in German, wonderfully trashy speech, people are replaced by cyborgs and androids because of the bizarre censorship then and now, blood is turned into oil. In the actual game, however, the uncensored version is shown, in which units fall to the ground bleeding and whose menu symbols have not been replaced by robot versions. We don’t think that’s bad, especially when we rock our heads in front of our screens to the excellent soundtrack.

Command and Conquer: Remastered Edtition (Image: Petroglyph / Screenshot: Golem.de)

The iconic songs Industrial One composed by Frank Klepacki and his band Tiberian Sons have never sounded so good or the goosebumps producing Hell March. For this purpose, completely new songs were created that fit the topic and do not seem out of place. If you don’t like it, you can switch it off and listen to the original songs from the 90s instead.

What impresses us the most is the graphical revision, which can be switched at the push of a button and in real time.

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