Tech

Open RAN: USA also wants to push Nokia and Ericsson out of the market

Nokia has asked Congress to change proposed legislation that requires operators to use open-RAN equipment. The technology has not yet matured, said Nokia Americas chief technology officer Michael Murphy this week, according to reports from MobileWorldLive and Light reading at a hearing before the US Senate. Murphy referred to a bill introduced in January to set up a $ 750 million fund to support Open RAN research and development.

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The law would force operators to commit to switching to O-RAN within seven years if they want to receive a reimbursement for the cost of replacing equipment from Huawei that has been classified as a threat to national security.

Murphy opposed the regulation at the hearing, arguing that there was a lack of products that fully met the specifications of the ORAN Alliance. It might not be reasonable for some of the companies "least capable of early adopter" are to impose such a requirement instead of one "technology neutral" Approach to choose. "In reality, fully compliant open interfaces, as defined by the ORAN Alliance, have never been provided anywhere in the world"Murphy said.

The open RAN provider Mavenir is of a different opinion: "The introduction of Open RAN in the United States will break up the duopolistic situation resulting from the massive consolidation among providers. This consolidation has resulted in Ericsson and Nokia controlling the lion's share of the US cellular infrastructure."Mavenir said in recent filings with the FCC (Federal Communications Commission). The requirement for Open-RAN interfaces will enable the development of more technical innovation, price competition and new service and business models and will allow rural mobile network operators to reduce capital and operating costs.

Virtually all Open RAN providers come from the United States, where Huawei was excluded from the Trump administration. A U.S. government official even suggested buying European outfitters Nokia and Ericsson. The requirements for Open RAN in the US, on the other hand, significantly weaken Nokia and Ericsson, whose business is based on proprietary hardware and software, in the US market.

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